Pauline Rignall.. Myths

painters Tubes Editor interviews Pauline Rignall at her studio for issue#8

Pauline is a painter who is exploring ‘human sensuality’ through the inspiration of myths and legends in her recent work.  She translates these often suppressed, or  hidden sexual feelings, into vibrant dynamic contemporary art. She is also a gifted landscape artist. Tubes editor, Denis Taylor, visited her recently in her home studio to discover more about her and her art. – You can read the full interview in issue #8 – back issue available soon

extract from essay.

“Myths are dramatised psychology, an expression of the inner life through the creative imagination. They are both universal and personal, being symbolic of the  patterns and energies operating in the cosmos in society and the individual.”    Pauline Rignall

….There was nothing mythical about my recent meeting with pauline Rignall in her cottage studio nestled among the very lovely and quintessential English Derbyshire hills. As I stepped off the train Pauline was waiting to greet me at the gate of the small country railway station. And in less than a few minutes we were sat at her dining table enjoying coffee and a piece of home made cake, talking Art and painting in general. Pauline is a gentle sensuous soul one that is reflected in many of her paintings, albeit not that obvious to the casual observer of her figurative paintings. However, her landscape painting  do reflect a serenity and an appreciation of the beauty of nature that surrounds her.

Pauline’s has a deceptive strength of character that is partially masked by a playfulness and genuine love of Art and literature. I first became aware of her as an artist when she contacted Tubes with a submission to be included in the ‘landscape’ feature of 2017  (issue # 5)…. read more soon..

Can artists write about other artists much better than non-artists?

As the Editor of painters Tubes magazine and a full time artist, I have found that writing about other artists gives me a sort of insider knowledge…

Tubes magazine. Can artists write about other artists better than non-artists?
Giorgio Vasari

As the Editor of painters Tubes magazine and a full time artists for 30 years, I have found that writing about other artists (in my case painters) gives me a sort of insider knowledge of how artists process their work, from both intellectual and physical angles. When interviewing other artists this special understanding forms the basis of our conversation(s) and helps me to get to the ‘pip-of- the-poodle’, as they say in Sweden. Little time is wasted on talking about the contingencies of painting- say, the choice of paint, the type of base preferred (board, canvas etc). Nor do I waste interview-time making a list of their education background, academic or art competition gongs, or any other ‘list’ that are usually intended to impress prospective buyers or potential representation of galleries.

I find that four to five hours is required to fully examine and get to the bottom line of the artists real reasons for living life an artist. What it is that drives them and provides the impetus to continue with ‘needing’ to create something original and authentic – This is often more complex than most people realise. Total confusion on the ‘why’ to create at all, is always that empty space that manifests itself as the struggle felt, as is the overpowering ‘need’ to gain not only recognition of ones peers, but also from total strangers, art agents or art galleries who may wish to actually purchase or value the work. Separation of the conscious ego from the subconscious creative mind remains an issue, as it has always been.

My conversations with artists helps me to confront some ‘hidden-agendas’ head on. ‘How to survive as a full time time painter’, for example, is often talked about, or rather, how difficult that is to maintain in the 21st Century. “Too many artists, not enough space to exhibit”, frequently comes up in ‘chats’ as an irritation, as does the gallery bias for one type of art over another or the ‘lottery’ of being singled out on the www for acclaim. Social Media addiction is always a problem for artists, especially for those that post every single brush stroke they make for the world to admire, i.e. “here’s one I started this morning..” type of post- (unfinished ‘updates’ of art is one habit that I personally abhor). 
Some writers of art prefer to ramble on the aesthetics of this or that work of art, using words that simpler descriptions would suffice quite adequately. And whereas that ‘academic way’ is probably a very 20th century way of writing about Art, it is still utilised today to avoid discussing the real practical issues facing painters. Or indeed what their Art is really ‘all about.’

The other difference, I have found, as an artist interviewing another artist is, I am truly interested in how a work or series of work came about, not in any ‘journalistic’ way, but as a fellow artist who experienced similar ‘awakenings’ or insights. It is also not that difficult for an artist who interviews another artist to quickly spot an ‘image-maker’ from an artist who ‘works’ to develop their Art rather than simply live off it.
For me, as the Editor of an Art Magazine, one that is devoted to ‘paintings and painters’ it seems clear that I should be looking to encourage other Artists to start to write about other Artists. If I am lucky enough to achieve that aim – I honestly think Art in general will be the better for it.

Denis Taylor Artist and Editor of TUBES
Artist and editor of TUBES – Denis Taylor

Header image of Giorgio Vasari an Italian painter, architect, writer, and historian, most famous today for his Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, considered the ideological foundation of art-historical writing.