the Industrial Link

Fiddklers Ferry Project - painters TUBES magazineabove: The sleek designed Mersey Gateway Bridge stands in front of the Iconic Fiddlers Ferry Power Station. (photograph by ©Lee Harrison)

the Industrial Link   

written by Denis Taylor Artist and Editor for painters TUBES magazine

“…In the days where the art academies dictated what fine art painting was and what it wasn’t, it was only historical art that was regarded as the ‘defacto’ work to be taken ‘seriously’  all genres of art came in second, third and fourth in the order of importance.

The art game changed however with the onset and public popularity of the Barbizon painters, Corot, Alexander Cozens, Poussin, J.M.W. Turner and perhaps more powerfully for the UK, (albeit belatedly), John Constable. It was these painters that forced the institutions to reassess their bias as to what sort of work should be viewed as ‘serious art.’

In many way ways this highlights the art world of today, but in an absolute opposite standpoint . Today historical art is seen as dead and buried – no one is interested in recording an historical event as such – unless of course it’s a radical arts led concept to undermine the social political establishment. Of course that sort of Art is sometimes needed – if only to ensure our rulers are kept a close eye on, but this type of imagery in ‘visual art’ is ineffective as far as making an impact or an effect on society is concerned. Social media, Twitter in particular, has taken on that role gladly, ridiculing the powerful, as and when required. Which it does rather well with total freedom and a huge helping of negativity….”

So…a few years ago, I came across a fellow visual artist (Shaun Smyth) who was actually recording something of historical note as by way of a change, my interest was aroused. After a few conversations and more importantly, viewing the actual brilliant sketch works created in the artists studio…

Shaun Smyth -painters TUBES magazine…I encouraged the support of  painters TUBES magazine to back the artist and the exhibition whole heartedly. That exhibition was to be called “Constructing the Mersey Gateway Bridge.” The title given from an amazing governmental instigated [new] long needed infrastructure project, one which would create an actual gateway from the Mersey area to the rest of the North West of England.

It was a part of the ‘regeneration of the old industrial towns’ that have been ‘neglected’ for six or more decades – It was a significant structure in both intention and actual physical presence. The Mersey Gateway Bridge was completed and officially opened on the 4th June 2018 by Queen Elizabeth ll of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Three years prior to the bridge opening for traffic. Shaun Smyth had already been sketching and painting the beginnings of it from the onset of the bridge construction.  By 2018 Shaun had created dozens of examples of the bridge showing every stage of it’s construction. Luckily, the artist passed the structure every day on his way to his art teaching job at a local School.

Shaumn Smyth painting -with painters TUBES magazineShaun eventually produced a mass of work – Large, small and medium in his own style.  The actual paintings tended towards realism but with contemporary flashes of paint applied loosely with absolute skill and passion. As a local born and bred artist, Shaun added a non-apologetic large creative slice of regional pride.

Catalogue Brindley Exhibition - painters TUBES magazinepainters TUBES magazine created and funded the prodcution of the catalogue and the media push, ensuring this important serious art was exhibited in a way that both the work and the project deserved. In this aim the first sign of success came in the form of support from the Brindley Theatre, the Hatton Borough Council, [+painters TUBES magazine] and Bell Lamb and Joynson Solicitors, all of whom ensured that the show became a reality from the 18th February 2018 to 5th April 2019- (please click here to read the: Exhibition Catalogue on line).

During the course of preparation for Mersey Gateway Bridge exhibition it came to the attention of Shaun that an historical icon of the area was on the brink of being ‘de-commissioned’ – That iconic structure was an incredible landmark of the North West of England known as Fiddlers Ferry Power Station – One of five coal fired stations still operational in the UK. For me, it was obvious that these two subjects should be brought together. The new Mersey Gateway Bridge – And the past glory of Coal Fired Power stations. The Fiddlers Ferry still holds an enormous historical importance in the hearts and the minds of people of the North West of England. And unlike the bridge, it was an integral piece of fantastic technology that was born out of the industrial revolution, the revolution that physically put the word ‘Great’ as a prefix to ‘Britain.’

Despite the understandable decisions to change how power is generated for national consumption for the 21st century (to reduce carbon emissions), for the benefit of the environment, Fiddlers Ferry should be given the respect it so richly deserves. Especially for the generations of people it has served and to provide historical reference and a narrative for future generations. It was with this in mind that myself, Shaun Smyth and Lee Harrison came to the conclusion that it was an Art project very worthy of serious attention.

Lee Harrison Photographer- painters TUBES magazineabove: Fiddlers Ferry created a ‘wild life’ environment with the excess water the plant needed for it’s colling towers. ©Lee Harrison.

Lee, a well known, gifted photographer, had been photographing Fiddlers Ferry Power Station for a few years before our new project was born, even though it was from an interest in how the power station could be seen from afar in the North West of England from great distances. And Shaun had already made many sketches of Fiddlers as the station was so close to the Mersey Gateway Bridge that they were in an almost symbiotic visual relationship. My own interest was initiated way back in 1988/89, when I first documented the Agecroft Power Station [before it was decommissioned and then demolished in May 1994] with a painting known widely as ‘Acid Trip’ ©DenisTaylor1988/1989-  And of course I realises that this project was a terrific subject for articles for painters TUBES magazine, of which I act as an editor in chief.

So far, the new project has advanced quickly with Shaun, Lee and myself discussing the narrative and planning various concepts of presentation of the project in a public space. We discussed how various segments like video, photography, interviews of the staff could be shown along side oil paintings that are both realistic and some abstracted visions, all integrated into one visually powerful exhibition with a potentially huge public interest, especially in the North of England.

Shaun, Lee and Denis Taylor -painters TUBES Fiddlers Ferry Projectabove (from left): Shaun Smyth, Lee Harrison and Denis Taylor in front of the large painting in Fiddlers Ferry Power Station Sept 2019.

With the go ahead for access given for the project from Fiddler Ferry,  Shaun immediately launched into an ambitious painting of the ‘outside view’ of the station. This work will underpin future exhibitions and also give an immediate visual reference to the scale of the Fiddlers Ferry power plant. This oil on plywood painting, measuring 1200mm x 4800mm wide (4 ft x 16ft) is the first of a planned number of major works (to be created by Shaun)  that the project will exhibit – And hopefully in more than one location in the North West of England.

The project will continue until Fiddlers Ferry has totally vanished from the landscape (in 36 months) – inbetween time the project is looking to hold a number of smaller exhibitions in immediate the local areas where the public can follow the ambitious project during its journey – as it documents this architectural, technological and quite incredible icon of the 20th century.

Above: Shaun Smyth and Lee Harrison at the pre-opening of the Mersey Gateway Bridge Exhibition at the Brindley. Photograph by DenisTaylor

Both the Mersey Gateway Bridge and Fiddlers Ferry Power Generating Station are equally important for the whole of society – one showing the path for the future – and the other respecting the achievement of the past – Both linked intrinsically with the people of the North West of England and far beyond the shores of the United Kingdom.

written Denis Taylor for painters TUBES magazine ©2019

Interested parties, sponsors,  venues or for more information please contact info@painterstubes.com – marking Fiddlers Ferry Project as the subject matter.

Tubes Artists Gallery.

Tubes Artists Gallery is now on line

Tubes Artists Gallery is now on line – the printed version is available to order – click here to view the gallery and order your printed copy

Tubes Artists Gallery – showcase number 3 Front and Back Cover of TAG#3 – ©Cherie Grist.
CLICK BUY NOW – BELOW for your TAG#3 ONLY £5.oo +pp UK delivery 30th


Artists participating in TAG#3 are:

Anthony Barrow The ‘portrait’ paintings shown in TAG#3 are immediately attractive to the viewing public at large and have proved this with the interest generated by the social media on the TUBES platforms over the last few weeks in October. These are accomplished works which have a unique approach to application of  the chosen medium, skilfully applied onto a flat surface.

Anthony’s artistic concern goes beyond the image and explores the representational using memory as much as references. The artists subject matter is not restricted to ‘human figures’ and includes still life and landscape. Although it is his figures and portraiture that he tends to concentrate his focus on. website: https://anthonybarrow.co.uk/

Arwyn Quick – Arwyn is no stranger to TUBES magazine as we have featured his abstract work in a special feature. Then, as now, Arwyn has a passion for colour and the natural world inspired by the remote Derbyshire Peaks in the UK. Tubes were taken by Arwyn’s abstractions based on landscape, however in the work shown here in TAG #3 is more of the work that the artists is better known for. www.arwynquick

Cherie Grist – An exciting abstract expressionist with a [recent] inclination to formal geometric abstraction the artist explodes her colour onto the canvas. As most abstract expressionist will tell you, ‘feelings and memories’, help the to form the initial beginnings of the Artwork, and Cherie is no exception to that common artistic thread. However, what is refreshing is her unique approach to creating the finished image – At one time explosive with broad colour strokes, then with large lumps of colour overlaid and achieved by pouring the paint from the edge of the canvas, controlling the flow by moving the canvas in a slow motion, one that seems carried out by listening to the paints desires and wishes where it wants to flow. Here is what she says of her own practice. http://www.cheriegrist.com

 Front and Back Cover of TAG#3 – ©Cherie Grist.

Claire McCarthy – Claire is now entering an enlightening  phase where her heritage is starting to direct her attention to specific art creation. The artist is from a family who originated in Ireland her memories has always been connected to the Mersey Docks, the Sea, the Dockers, the Ships and the people of Liverpool. As the world changes and in particular the UK , which continues on its course of regeneration of the industrial North, much of the local history, character and what was once its financial strength is not only changing but disappearing.  Very few Artists are embarking on a mission to capture that heritage for future generations. Claire is a leading artist in this regard and is working towards an exhibition project with paintings and new media. https://www.clairemccarthy.co.uk

Claudia Araceli – Claudia is what many people call a ‘plein-air’ painter – That is she works direct from nature and from what is in front of her. TUBES covered plein air in the main magazine (issue #13)  and so it is with absolute confidence that I can say that I do not agree with Claudia being labelled in any way – except – as a gifted painter.  https://www.claudiaaraceli.com/

David Bez – No stranger to TUBES [or the curator of TAG] David’s  work draws inspiration from the urban, industrial and pastoral landscapes in and around his home. I  the works shown in TAG# –  Tubes have selected the artists ‘Deconstruction’ series of work – These ‘fantasy’ paintings demonstrate David’s fabulous imagination and pure talent – The artist utilises a Faux Vitrial process, hand embellishing with silicates and resins. This process adds a depth and richness to the paintings, giving a unique and exclusive finish to the work (see more work on: https://www.facebook.com/davidbezartist)

Jocelyn Roberts – Jocelyn is what I would term an environmental painter with a unique talent for capturing the faces of nature. Her word is both strong, when nature demonstrates her power – and so very gentle on those special days that we have all experienced under the open and blue skies of a summers day. https://www.bodnant-artgallery.co.uk/jocelyn-roberts-1

Malcolm Dobbins – The unique abstract work of the artist is easily recognisable, and has been for quite some time. Malcolm has been painting for over four decades. His medium is acrylic and his style has been developed from master twentieth centuries masters such as Hans Hoffman through to Franz Kline – Although his own abstractions he feels is more akin to Abstract- Realism –  than it is to pure abstraction as Hoffman or Kline work obviously are.  It is not uncommon to see Malcolm’s style emulated these days, as other artists are attracted by the beauty of the simplification of landscape that Malcolm achieves – Yet, none can match his colour sense – or the way in which he carefully balances the colour tones within a specific composition, an attention to detail which is all his own. www.malcolmdobbins.co.uk

Martin Davis –“The drive to create work is my emotional response to colour, my love of form and to the effects on both of light & atmosphere.” So says the artist about his art – Didactic and an ex fire-fighter who was born and raised in the coalfields of Derbyshire, Martin Davis is an Artist who is reluctant to call himself by that ‘illustrious’ title. The reader may well disagree with him after viewing his work in TAG #3 –https://martindavisartist.co.uk/

Ron Etherington. One of the select ‘Saddleworth’ painters that has been encouraged and guided by a painter (well known to the Editor of painters TUBES magazine), John McCombs – John has guided many an artist practicing today including, Ann Parkin, David Edwards, Steve Tringer, Ian Norris and Margaret Hinchliffe  all of whom took John’s class with Ron Ehtherington in 2010. www.painterstube.gallery

PRINTED VERSION -TAG# (Tubes Artists Gallery)

TAG #3 Tubes Artists Gallery

Tubes Artists Gallery will be published on the 20th October- it will feature 10 artists selected from the painters TUBES closed group on Facebook.

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artists join the closed Facebook Group and have your Art featured in the Gallery publication

TAG#3 – Tubes Artists Gallery will be published on the 20th October- it will feature 10 artists selected from the painters TUBES closed group on Facebook.

To buy your personal  Printed Copy of TUBES ARTISTS GALLERY  Click Here £5. plus post and packing (UK) Europe, Canada, US £10 inclusive of p&P

Here are the ten artists that are featured in TAG#3 – Cherie Grist, Anthony Barrow, Claudia Araceli, Arwyn Quick, Jocelyn Roberts, Dave Bez, Martin Dobbins, Claire McCarthy, Martin Davis and Ron Etherington.

The group of painters now running at over 350 members consist of all types of painting genré – landscape, classic and contemporary, portraiture, abstract expressionism, formal abstract, new expressionism, naive, digital paintings and a whole array of new mediums.  If you are a painter and want to share your work to gain comments, positive encouragement and ideas and be in line for selection as a featured artist in Tubes Artists Gallery

 JOIN US… Sign in to Facebook – go to @painterstubes – give a ‘Like’ and click on the blue visit group button – answer the question… “where have you exhibited?” –   And you will be made a member (subject to the conditions and regulations of the group).  There is no fees or charges and TUBES does not ask for any monies for artists features in the Gallery or in the main mag.

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go to @painterstubes to join us on FaceBook

TUBES readers information: painters TUBES magazines are independent art publications. They are designed and produced at Studio 5 Angelholm in Skane, Sweden.  They are printed in the UK and Administered by artists. The magazine branding and it’s associated url’s are: ©2013-painters TUBES magazine.com, ©2019-paintertubes.gallery and ©2019 TUBESmag.com –  All are registered and owned by the Taylor [TUBES Family]. The Tubes family consists of : Barry Taylor. Financial Consultant.(UK)  Denis Taylor, Artist, Writer and current Editor (Sweden and the UK). Marianne Arnberg Taylor. Artist and Assistant Editor (Sweden). Adam Taylor. Reporter (UK). Distributors. Lynda (nee: Taylor) & Paul Slater (UK). Past and present Current major projects include: Constructing the Mersey Gateway Bridge – Shaun Smyth, Exhibition at the Brindley Centre 2019. UK. “defining the elemental” Mixed artists exhibition, Dean Clough, Crossley Gallery, 2018-2019. The Second Nature Project. UK and Europe, panel discussion and exhibition – 2020-2021. Fiddlers Ferry Project 2020-2021- Lee Harrison and Shaun Smyth  North West England Exhibition of Photography and paintings. The Docks Project- Paintings, video, portraiture with  Claire McCarthy and artists associates. Liverpool. North West UK. 2020-2021 Contributors/Writers: (past and present)  Gregory Evans, David Tycho, David Mark Lloyd,  Cahil Art Consultant, Colin Taylor, Dean Entwistle, Laurence Causse Parsley, David Traves, Diane Terry, Barry De Moore. Resident Art Critics headed under the  ‘Spike’ generic label: consists of  Paul Constantine and Barry Ornszitt and Denis Taylor.

painters TUBES issue #13

Excellent Article on plein air painting – a brilliant essay by Gregory Evans – Taking risks. A review of the legendary Russell Howarth (master painter from the North of England by Marianne Arnberg)  New contemporary paintings from the UK, Europe and the USA  Plus a new TUBES section where artists get to talk about their own words the new section is called “in their own words” – This issue Mark David Lloyd gives a great overview of his practise.

TUBES magazine new issueNEW ISSUE – READ ON LINE CLICK HERE

In this issue:  Excellent Article on plein air painting – a brilliant essay by Gregory Evans – Taking risks. A review of the legendary Russel Howarth (master painter from the North of England by Marianne Arnberg)  New contemporary paintings from the UK, Europe and the USA  Plus a new TUBES section where artists get to talk about their own words the new section is called “in their own words” – This issue Mark David Lloyd gives a great overview of his practise.

This is how Google explain what plein air painting is…
“…en  plein air  is a French expression that means “in the open  air.” It is used by  artists to  describe the  art  of outdoor  painting, capturing landscapes and views in natural light. This kind of  art  has been a popular practice for centuries and requires specific skills and techniques.”

Do you agree with that definition? Technically it is correct, well the first part is, I mean it is French for in the open air, but what about the rest of the statement. Is it really used by artists to describe their work? Or is it used more by Art professionals, galleries, social media platforms to place this sort of art into a convenient ‘art’ box? – personally I think the later rather than the former is correct. Does it need a special skill ? Not really, painting is painting isn’t it? Not matter where or what you paint with or even on, inside or outside, it’s more complex than the skill – it’s more complicated than just having some sort of natural talent or a gift for transcription of an object or scene that is in front of you.” – intro written by the Editor of painters TUBES magazine

Contemporary Artists featured in this issue: Amanda Oilphant, Russel Howarth, Brian Cote, Gregory Evans, Helen Skidmore, Mark David Lloyd, Richard Suckling, Stephen Stringer, Niki Heenan, Barry De More – Edited by artist and writer Denis Taylor.

 all future issues of painters TUBES magazine on line will carry a small fee. Single Read will be £3 – with 6 magazines subscription at only £2 each  SUBSCRIBE FOR SIX ISSUES (ONE YEAR) – CLICK HERE

links: Denis Taylor personal website:http://denisartist.com

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illusionary world of artists freedom…

an illusionary world of Artistic freedom. article written by the Artist Denis Taylor.

I strayed across an interesting old video on You Tube. It was was on those that you find popping up on a feed after you have watched something similar, which is annoying. But, it got me thinking about the relationship between Artistic freedom and Modern Religious Art. This particular You Tube discussion, come lecture, come educational piece, was presented by a line up of tenured academics and young post graduate teachers.

The panel argued how Contemporary Art institutions reacted negatively to work that was based in some sort of religious subject.The discussion started after an initial lecture by one of the Academics, David Thyrell. So began two hours of surprising statements, amusing quotes, some fairly logical reasoning, heart felt speeches and many contradictions from an art academic viewpoint.

painting of a Saint by Italian master in TUBES magazine.

Thyrell reckoned that… “Only Art that is critical of (western) religion of faith is acceptable as Contemporary Art. And all other art that could be read as religious, is translated to one of a post minimalistic view.” (And)…”that all references to faith and religion is edited out at source”. (And)…”the contemporary Art world does not seek any debate on this form of art because they see it as non-progressive, as propagandistic and not supportive of an advancing culture or indeed, enlightening mankind for the new centuries ahead of us.”Thyrell spoke with passion and summed up his lecture by stating”it seems, that religious work that is non-specific, for example, non-stated religious, ambiguous or totally abstracted with very loose associations, are acceptable as Contemporary Art. Providing the images are not from a Judeo Christian slant. However, the tribal, the Asiatic or the cultism subjects are OK.“

Judaeo-Christian made up the bulk of the audience (note: it was held at a Roman Catholic University) I guessed they must have been appalled by the status-quo of the implied bigotry against religious art levelled against the- ‘Artists of Faith’ – as they call themselves. For me personally, there is no need to be religious specific to appreciate (or create) Art that is good, even if that Art owns its very existence to institutions of any religion persuasion who sponsored it, or indeed created by an artist that holds a particular belief system or faith.

Detail of a painting by Pontormo in painters Tubes magazine
detail of Pontormo’s ‘deposition’ (1525‒28) at the church of Santa Felicita, Florence

Good Art is what floats my boat, I don’t care who or why or for whom it was created for.

As for the rest of the Art that floods the web and the mass media art reviews, much of that Art that personally I find sort of shallow, egoistically based, trendy or with intellectual invested admiration intentions, I simply pass quickly by, metaphorically speaking, without so much as a cursory thought. For me to be anguished by an Art as the above, only goes to validate it as important to human cultural advancement, which I think it is not.

Most artists, (those I do know personally), when looking at a work of art that could be deemed as ‘Religious’, tend to ignore the possible original intended propaganda or dogma of it, but rather they concentrate on the pure magic of the Art work in front of them. For example some the work of by Pontormo and El Grego, to mention only two (religious) painters of the far distant past, whose work I greatly admire and gain much from. After a while I began to feel that the lecture, come debate, was myopic, but Thyrell’s argument did instigate an examination of my own thoughts on the subject of Modern Art & Freedom of Creation and Modern Religious beliefs in our, so called, multi-sectarian developed Western societies.

If a contemporary artist can go beyond an intellectual subject matter and demonstrate a visual power conducted via an innermost and deeply held belief, then surely that is still a vital and sustainable contemporary Art, is it not? No matter what religion the creator of that art subscribes too, or not as the case maybe. After all, isn’t atheism a brand of religion by another name?

The Rothko Chapel in Texas -article in painters Tubes magazine
Rothko Chapel Texas USA (rothkochapel.com)

If we look closer to our own time, rather than the centuries when the Church and Monarchies of Rome and Spain dominated major art commissions, say from the early and middle centuries, we can find a new sort of religious art. Malevich, Kandinsky, Mondrian and the like studied theosophy and talked of a ‘spiritual’ art. Pollock, used the practises of the the Indian Sand Painters, which involved connection with ancestors souls or spirits. Rothko and the gang of colour field painters also spoke of mediative involvement and introspection. Are all those artworks a form of religion? If you have ever visited the Rothko ‘Chapel’ in Texas, you’ll know what I am talking about. And what of Chagall. Are his paintings nothing more than illustrated nostalgia based on childhood memories of stories taken from the Old Testament? Or let’s take Vincent Van Gough, was not his paintings a projection of the love of nature reinterpreted through his own deep seated belief in a universal God? How about Agnes Martin or Sam Francis, each with a Buddhist inclination for transcendentalism or meditation. Is that not religious Art ?

Sam Francis, painter in his studio in paintersTubesmagazine
Sam Francis painting in his studio

In the early 20th century the word nihilistic art was being brandished about to describe the work of the Futurist (Italy), whose dogma was Machines and War to cleanse society and shock it out of it’s perceived malaise [of the time]. The Dada movement used the same framework with banal poetry, non-sensical drama and outlandish visual presentations [to hide away from and in reaction to the horrors of World War One]. Again, the essence here is that the Dada movement believed in something – however abstract that was – rather than nothing. And this obtuse oddity of their belief carried on manifesting itself decades later as the impatience of post-modernist [young] artists and the ambitious driven post-post modernists, and the current belief that ‘selling art, means that it must be good ‘Art’ – And made by a succesful artist (rounds of applause by living painters, can be heard here on instagram and facebook) which where I guess we find ourselves in today’s visual art world.

Though, just maybe the web is changing the ground rules. I don’t know about you, but when I view art on the web, I find more and more of it has a growing and obvious ‘belief-structure’ of some kind behind it. And much of it is good Art, mostly created by ‘unknowns’. Sure, there is still that twee stuff and the obvious bash it out to sell it for financial gain ‘ hamburger art’, not forgetting the overly academic art whitterings of art professors and so called art intellectuals who try to convince the audiences in the cities of the world, that this piece of stuff or that offerings of purely conceptual ideas, is great progressive Art (and not just simply a novel or good idea). After all it does put a high monetary value sticker on it, provided it is accompanied by the obligatory academic recommendations, especially if the Art has the blessings of Art Directors of state run institutions.

Affirmative Art, an essay by Nigel Whiteley in painters TUBES magazine

So, do Artists have total freedom to create what Art they want?  Maybe not entirely, if you agree with David Thyrell in the You Tube video I mentioned earlier. Is Religious Art (in all it’s manifestations) making a comeback? The Zeitgeist signs suggests it may well be, but not in the ‘normal’ sense of the word. In this world of the politics of infusing the inhabitants with psychological terror, global climate change fear, mega disaster predictions, the accelerating greed for money and power, irresponsible political leaders and not forgetting the inhumanity to humanity we witness daily, a world that we live in today (and perhaps always have). Maybe it’s not such a bad ambition for visual artists to ascend to a higher level and start to transmit messages of hope. And if you’ll pardon the religious, (come 1960’s hippy reference and of course the Artist known as John Lennon) visual art messages of Love and Peace, for all who reside on this tiny insignificant planet tucked away in the corner the limitless time and space of the universe.

As David Byrne once wrote,

Heaven is a place, where Nothing ever happens.”

So, now I have to gather my courage and meander slowly to my studio, where another blank space awaits. I wonder what will appear? I guess I just have to have faith that something of real artistic value will show itself, maybe even holding the restorative creative power of the universe itself ?

One never knows, that’s one reason to be an Artist, isn’t it?

©2018/2019 written by Denis Taylor, Artist and Editor of painters Tubes magazine

the universe - on painters Tubes magazine
small part of the many Universes – photograph from NASA

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