painters TUBES magazine

leading specialist art publication

Category: #painting

painters TUBES magazine -Denis Taylor

who is god? what is art?

Those are questions asked by the artist in the illustrated poem – PALIA HORA – which is Greek for Old Capital City (or town). Palia Hora of Aegina island once was the home of the entire island. It was in the centre of the island and afforded (and still affords) magnificent views over the entire Saronic Gulf – which was it’s downfall, as the inhabitants turned to piracy – and the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire ordered his General (Barrabus) to destroy the town and kill all its people – as a matter of a lesson to all – The Greek people built the town over a thousand years – and each important family had their own Chapel to worship God (Greek Orthodox) . Barrabus – (who mother was Greek) however left 32 chapels standing in remembrance of his brother (who died at the early age of 32) and out of respect for his mother. Today the Chapels have been restored (respectfully) by the Greek Church and visitors can now see murals in the chapels from the 12th to the 15th century by master Greek painters whose names have faded with time.

Click here to go directly to the publication  (best viewed on a large screen device (phone ipad, slate, laptop or desk top computer – all operating systems)

painters TUBES magazine -Denis Taylor

an illustrated poem by Denis Taylor Artist and editor of painters TUBES magazine

painters TUBES magazine

Ian Mood – new work

Featured in the upcoming issue #8 of painters Tubes magazine, will be Ian Mood, a painter who is creating a unique series of work based on his Grand fathers paintings of Stoke-on-Trent. It’s an idea that emerged slowly over time and Ian has now established a project studio in the Stoke City Centre, to make the idea a reality. During our Editor’s visit, Ian introduced him to the trustee’s of Burslem School of Art, http://www.burslemschoolofart.com/, that also have a fascinating story to tell.

Ian’s series of work – “common ground.” – will be exhibited in the art School’s fabulous building and exhibition space. Tubes issue #8 will be discussing the project and taking a general look at Ian’s work over the last years, which includes some unique semi-abstract (expressionist) paintings dealing with the human form and also his earlier landscape paintings…Tubes issue#8….not to be missed.

Painters Tubes in Stoke on Trent UK

Ian Mood in his new studio (Stoke-on-Trent, UK)

image©painterstubesmagazine/DenisTaylor 2018

painters TUBES magazine

Pauline Rignall.. Myths

painters Tubes Editor interviews Pauline Rignall at her studio for issue#8

Pauline is a painter who is exploring ‘human sensuality’ through the inspiration of myths and legends in her recent work.  She translates these often suppressed, or  hidden sexual feelings, into vibrant dynamic contemporary art. She is also a gifted landscape artist. Tubes editor, Denis Taylor, visited her recently in her home studio to discover more about her and her art. – You can read the full interview in issue #8 – back issue available soon

extract from essay.

“Myths are dramatised psychology, an expression of the inner life through the creative imagination. They are both universal and personal, being symbolic of the  patterns and energies operating in the cosmos in society and the individual.”    Pauline Rignall

….There was nothing mythical about my recent meeting with pauline Rignall in her cottage studio nestled among the very lovely and quintessential English Derbyshire hills. As I stepped off the train Pauline was waiting to greet me at the gate of the small country railway station. And in less than a few minutes we were sat at her dining table enjoying coffee and a piece of home made cake, talking Art and painting in general. Pauline is a gentle sensuous soul one that is reflected in many of her paintings, albeit not that obvious to the casual observer of her figurative paintings. However, her landscape painting  do reflect a serenity and an appreciation of the beauty of nature that surrounds her.

Pauline’s has a deceptive strength of character that is partially masked by a playfulness and genuine love of Art and literature. I first became aware of her as an artist when she contacted Tubes with a submission to be included in the ‘landscape’ feature of 2017  (issue # 5)…. read more soon..

painters TUBES magazine

CPH Art Space

Denis Taylor Artist at CPH art spaceIt was a very cold Easter Saturday that both myself and Marianne (sub-editor of Tubes) visited the Copenhagen Art Space for an annual exhibition. The venue is situated in the developing Nordhavbn (North Harbour) part of the Danish Capital City. The venue known as ‘Docken’ is a space which is expansive and well appointed. Art Space 2018 is an Art and Culture event that is approaching ten years old. The show runs over three days which may bring to mind Art Fairs in the UK, however this exhibition has the feeling of    a Salon, rather than an Art Fair.

Denis Taylor Artist and Editor of painters Tubes magazine at Copenhagen Art SpaceThe warm laid back welcoming that you get when entering the show made up for the bitter cold wind outside and allowed you to really enjoy what’s on offer. It was a breath of fresh air to witness the space given to each artist who exhibited, of which their were Sixty, all showing high quality, original, authentic work that was diverse enough for everyone’s particular taste. I began thinking that the space and the way it was presented could be a guiding light for the UK and Artists  to organize themselves to mount this sort of exhibition in similar spaces in the UK of which there are plenty available.

For me it was an opportunity to catch up with an old artist friend, Preben Saxild, an artist I had exhibited with in Stockholm at the Heart 2 Art exhibition in 2002. And one who’s work I have been following since before 1998. Preben has developed as an artist from being a very talented abstract expressionist, through to creating his unique landscape phase, and now a new line of work which is montage based, but with his own unique ‘take’ on life, one tinged with ‘irony’ political comment and sheer luxurious image making.

CPH3
Preben Saxild (left) and Denis Taylor (Editor of Tubes) catching up on his new work

Besides some great paintings there were also fabulous ceramic and metal sculptures on show, again I wished that the UK artists and private art galleries could visit these type of exhibitions in Skandinavia and be inspired by the originality of the Art, which is far more adventurous, in style and subject matter, (in my opinion), than most of the UK visual art that I have viewed over the last four or five years (in commercial galleries).
Below are a selection of some photographs (©Tubes magazine) of the venue and the art.

Pleasure. Power. Passion. Panache.

painters TUBES magazine

issue#7

issue #7 of painters TUBES magazine featured four brilliant artists each with their own article..

Here is the extract from one of those articles… Patrick Blower – famed as a cartoonist for the Telegraph in London (UK) but he is also known as an accomplished painter..

“Politicians get drowned…by the wonderful seascapes of Patrick Blower”

As the Editor of Tubes I often make trips to visit artists studios, sometimes unannounced, and very occasionally I am lucky to view some fantastic paintings, ones that are totally unexpected. This was the case in my recent visit to London and the Make Space Studios in Lambeth. I’d gone there to catch up with Laurence Causse Parsley, another artist who was featured in issue #5 (Landscape..from Poussin to today). After we chatted for a while about her recent work, she gave me a guided tour of the large building which housed up to twenty artists or so.

Laurence escorted me round the labyrinth of corridors, gently tapping on various doors to introduce me to those artists that were behind them. It was one of those days wintery days in London, the kind that, if you need not venture out then it was better to stay in and watch You Tube videos. The skin-penetrating drizzle was driven by a biting wind, which was enough to put off most of the artists from journeying to Lambeth.

However one of the artists that made the journey daily, rain or shine, was Patrick Blower.

Laurence tapped on his door, and a voice shouted “come-in:”

As I walked into his studio his out-stretched hand was married with a broad smile, which immediately endeared me to him. I spoke a few a words to introduce myself, he reacted to my short personal  introduction with “You’re a Manc.” (sic: someone born in the City of Manchester, North West England, ‘Manc’ being a specific term to identify place of birth and specific culture). Patrick’s accent was soft, with a definite southern twang. His quick witted, almost caustic humour was however totally natural and inoffensive. It came as a surprise to me, to learn later, he was actually born in Brussels (1959) to a Belgian Mother and  a British Father. He says his “ head is in London, his heart is in Europe and his balls are somewhere over the North Sea.”…continued in the back issue – available soon,

exhibition feature

Photograph below: Contemporary Artist, Denis Taylor in front of the installation at Crossley Gallery, Dean Clough, Halifax, UK 

Denis Taylor Artist and Writer. painters Tubes magazine

Denis Taylor with his work at Crossley Gallery, Dean Clough. Left: ‘Acid Trip’ (1985) Middle: ‘Life Began in Water’ (2018) Right: Cellular Abstraction (2014)

The exhibition “defining the elemental is an exhibition of painting in the UK. The ten artists participating are showing authentic work that covers contemporary landscape, portraits and new abstract painting. The extensive venue is the Crossley Gallery which is within the extremely large Dean Clough business  and culture complex in Halifax, West Yorkshire.

The exhibition began in October and ran through to 12th January 2019.
Many of the artists were renown throughout the North of England and beyond for their progressive, dynamic, semi-realist and abstract new work, such as, Denis Taylor, Ian Norris and Jeanette Barnes along with major project painters such as Shaun Smyth and original impasto styled (inspired by Kossoff/Auerbach) portraiture work  created by Richard Fitton and Barry De Moore.

reviews appeared in issue #10 of painters Tubes magazine.

painters Tubes

extract from the review in the magazine….

This is a show that has ten painters and writer who has created poems for the works on exhibition at the Crossley Gallery venue inside the expansive Dean Clough complex.

In the introduction David Traves points out the inspiation of British 20th century painters such as David Bomberg, Leon Kossof and Frank Auerbach, that some of the participating artists may have been inspired by, although that is referring to paint application, more than it is to the subjects.

The selected the group of artists was mostly chosen by Shaun Smyth.

The original concept and title for the exhibition. “Defining the Elemental” was his original idea and it conjures up a whole range of meanings behind it. Essentially the artwork to be shown is primarly based in nature subject matter, although one or two of the artists have expanded that to include the human figure and pure abstraction, work that perhaps have broader and more expansive meaning, as far as the human race is concerned. i.e. “initium aquam”  (Latin: Life began in Water) by Denis Taylor and “Rebuilding ground zero” by Jeanette Barnes. Richard Fitton, another fine painter, shows some new work, one in particular that is removed away from the impasto paintings he is known for, to a more delicate surface finish and his growing concern for the drawing content in his creative output (e.g: “Amy” mixed media- on loan from a private collector). Ian Norris exhibits his highly developed semi-abstract work with his accomplished and fabulous handling of paint, work that is always backed up by dedicated charcoal sketch works.

Can artists write about other artists much better than non-artists?

Tubes magazine. Can artists write about other artists better than non-artists?

Giorgio Vasari

As the Editor of painters Tubes magazine and a full time artists for 30 years, I have found that writing about other artists (in my case painters) gives me a sort of insider knowledge of how artists process their work, from both intellectual and physical angles. When interviewing other artists this special understanding forms the basis of our conversation(s) and helps me to get to the ‘pip-of- the-poodle’, as they say in Sweden. Little time is wasted on talking about the contingencies of painting- say, the choice of paint, the type of base preferred (board, canvas etc). Nor do I waste interview-time making a list of their education background, academic or art competition gongs, or any other ‘list’ that are usually intended to impress prospective buyers or potential representation of galleries.

I find that four to five hours is required to fully examine and get to the bottom line of the artists real reasons for living life an artist. What it is that drives them and provides the impetus to continue with ‘needing’ to create something original and authentic – This is often more complex than most people realise. Total confusion on the ‘why’ to create at all, is always that empty space that manifests itself as the struggle felt, as is the overpowering ‘need’ to gain not only recognition of ones peers, but also from total strangers, art agents or art galleries who may wish to actually purchase or value the work. Separation of the conscious ego from the subconscious creative mind remains an issue, as it has always been.

My conversations with artists helps me to confront some ‘hidden-agendas’ head on. ‘How to survive as a full time time painter’, for example, is often talked about, or rather, how difficult that is to maintain in the 21st Century. “Too many artists, not enough space to exhibit”, frequently comes up in ‘chats’ as an irritation, as does the gallery bias for one type of art over another or the ‘lottery’ of being singled out on the www for acclaim. Social Media addiction is always a problem for artists, especially for those that post every single brush stroke they make for the world to admire, i.e. “here’s one I started this morning..” type of post- (unfinished ‘updates’ of art is one habit that I personally abhor). 
Some writers of art prefer to ramble on the aesthetics of this or that work of art, using words that simpler descriptions would suffice quite adequately. And whereas that ‘academic way’ is probably a very 20th century way of writing about Art, it is still utilised today to avoid discussing the real practical issues facing painters. Or indeed what their Art is really ‘all about.’

The other difference, I have found, as an artist interviewing another artist is, I am truly interested in how a work or series of work came about, not in any ‘journalistic’ way, but as a fellow artist who experienced similar ‘awakenings’ or insights. It is also not that difficult for an artist who interviews another artist to quickly spot an ‘image-maker’ from an artist who ‘works’ to develop their Art rather than simply live off it.
For me, as the Editor of an Art Magazine, one that is devoted to ‘paintings and painters’ it seems clear that I should be looking to encourage other Artists to start to write about other Artists. If I am lucky enough to achieve that aim – I honestly think Art in general will be the better for it.

Denis Taylor Artist and Editor of TUBES

Artist and editor of TUBES – Denis Taylor

Header image of Giorgio Vasari an Italian painter, architect, writer, and historian, most famous today for his Lives of the Most Excellent Painters, Sculptors, and Architects, considered the ideological foundation of art-historical writing.

Denis Taylor Artist

Defining the Elemental

Defining the Elemental Exhibition”

Dean Clough. Halifax West Yorkshire

27th October through to 12th December 2019

Preview of the exhibition

This is a show that has ten painters and writer who has created poems for the works on exhibition at the Crossley Gallery venue inside the expansive Dean Clough complex.

In the introduction David Traves points out the inspiration of British 20th century painters such as David Bomberg, Leon Kossof and Frank Auerbach, that some of the participating artists may have been inspired by, although that is referring to paint application, more than it is to the subject.

The original concept and title for the exhibition. “Defining the Elemental” was his original idea and it conjures up a whole range of meanings behind it. Essentially the artwork to be shown in the main is based on nature, although one or two of the artists have expanded that to include the human figure and  one or two with pure abstraction work that perhaps have broader and more expansive connection with the title of the show,  i.e. “initium aquam” (Latin: Life began in Water) by Denis Taylor and “Rebuilding ground zero” by Jeanette Barnes. Richard Fitton, another fine painter, shows some new work, one in particular that is removed away from the ‘impasto paintings’ he is known for, to a more delicate surface finish and his growing concern for the drawing content in his creative output (e.g: “Amy” mixed media- on loan from a private collector). Ian Norris exhibits his highly developed semi-abstract work with his accomplished handling of paint, art works that are  always based on dedicated charcoal sketches.

Nicki Heenan and Miranda Richmond are to exhibit their delightful and unique landscape paintings along with ‘imagined’ landscape paintings of Richard Clare and the more definite subject based work of Stephen Stringer. Shaun Smyth shall be showing        a large panoramic painting of the Mersey Gateway Bridge, one of the many works that are to be shown at the Brindley Gallery, Merseyside with the exhibition ‘Constructing the Mersey Gateway Bridge’ (18th February 2018 to 5th April 2019). Shaun will also demonstrate his dedication as a skilled draughtsman by placing several charcoal sketch pieces next to his large painting. Barry De More, another painter whose work gives more than a nodding reference to Kossof and Frank Auerbach, will show works that range from the local environment of Keighley to Bradford (Yorkshire UK) to images of industrial workers on site.

All the painters and the work have a dedicated poem (prose) created by David Traves. His writing also extends to the brief introduction of the exhibition catalogue. David concentrates on his own reaction to each of the painters and their work and gives his own personal interpretation of the essence of each artist, words that are laid out in a classical manner, or style (i.e. short lines of words), but with deeper meaning behind them, meanings that perhaps encourages the reader to think more about the Art, and the artist(s) who created them.

All the work is available for acquisition by art institutions, public art galleries and the private art collector. Interested parties can contact, Crossley Gallery at Dean Clough (https://www.deanclough.com/) the artists directly or via the painters Tubes magazine contact form.

The exhibition runs from the 27th October 2018 through to the 12th January 2019 

Dean Clough, Crossley Galleries, Halifax HX3 5AX

Aegina Island Greece

Time Travel is never easy

Denis Taylor Greek Studio work

Aegina island in the Saronic Gulf. Greece

…way back in 1986, I decided to become a full time artist (painter). At least painting full time when it was possible. My self imposed rule #1 – was “to live for Art, and not live off Art.” – which sort of boxed me in, as I still needed to earn a living. This I did by working in a variety of jobs, writing articles and catalogues and selling the occasional canvas to interested parties, or taking on commissions, but only when someone asked me.
Somehow, years later, I found myself ensconced on island called Aegina. The island is close to Piraeus (19 kilometers) and thus Athens, where I could buy (piecemeal) oil paint, when I had the money, for Art supplies that is. It was here that I confronted the age old enemy of creatives – Ego – And it was here that I defeated it, albeit with the help of an invisible helping hand, which many people call their God. Unlike my home in Northern Europe, the Greek belief system was strong, and it would be unnatural for any creative not to absorb the atmosphere that surrounds them. The outcome was work which, up to then, I had never envisaged painting. This was linked to an incident, one that is too long to explain here, but let me just say, a miracle occurred that saved my life.

Oil painting by Denis Taylor 1993

“Stoned” painting created on Aegina island. ©Denis Taylor. now in a private collection in Sweden.

Time passed and my collection of paintings grew. Eventually I met my future wife, on another island, where I had accepted a commission to paint ‘Walls’ for a Greek friend who was setting up a ‘Rock and Roll cafe on Anti-Paros, a very small island in the Cyclandic’s. This chance meeting led to a Gallery exhibition in Stockholm (1995) and another one in the same year, before I knew where I was I had several shows, created a ‘radical’ group of mixed media Artists and curated, designed and participated in three major exhibitions, one of which was a commissioned [non paying] job for the Swedish Government Estonia Trust Fund and the International  Support Group, that one took over four years to complete [sic: Heart 2 Art- Stockholm January 2002]. And all the time, keeping to my #1 artists rule, I was earning a living doing other things [in the UK] remotely or directly.
Almost twenty years later, and now an artist in the Grey hair sector, I and my wife could scrape together enough time and money to spend a month on Aegina [July 2018]. And, as luck would have it, we were able to take my ‘Greek-Niece’ up on her kind offer to stay at her family home – which just happens to be above my old studio from all those decades ago. Hence the ‘time travel’ headline of this post.

Denis Taylor English Artist, Writer and Exhibition Curator

Studio 4 – Aegina island Greece

The studio had not been lived in or attended to for some years (my niece no longer lives there) And nature had began to take the place over. I resolved to spend the cooler mornings and late evenings bringing the place into ship shape. Mainly because I couldn’t bare to see it in that condition, and I wanted to ‘feel’ what I felt when I was a much younger artist, how I’d grown and developed in comparison, which was insightful. I recalled every single canvas I had painted there, in that place, the struggles, the ecstasy of a breakthrough and the disappointment of failure. I remembered the people, those characters who became more than close friends, now most of them, passed to the other side. At the back of the house I found my white plastic chair, and another for visitors, who would sit with me to discuss the painting I would have been currently working on.
I was time travelling, inside my mind, as I doggedly swept and moped, and swept and moped again and fought the weeds that had embedded themselves in ever crack and cranny. My human form bled salty water from every pore in its body, to cool itself down, but my mind was far to busy ‘travelling back in time’ to take any heed or warning to rest up and drink water.
At the end of all this, my voyage ended with a realisation of what I had actually achieved in Art per se, despite my rule #1, or because of it – And a truly personal sadness, that I could not share with them, that their high expectations, ones they were convinced that I could achieve in Art, had been.
So, ‘Time Travel’ is not easy – for many reasons – but I am sure it’s a trip everyone takes at some point in their life, the good, the bad, the tears the happiness. That’s what it’s all about, isn’t it?

Denis taylor Artist and Writer - Aegina island.

“One evening the sky talked of the past.”

posted and written by Denis Taylor. Artist and Writer.

Myths and Psychology

Artist Pauline Rignall – latest figurative work…. read Free on line… click here
TUBES international art magazine

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén